Kracktwist and Samza released the ‘Kotoku’ album, one of the best rap albums of 2021

Ishmael Kamara and Samza Frank Serry, popularly known as Kracktwist and Samza are arguably the best krio rappers in Sierra Leone and the best rap duo in Sierra Leone. The ‘certified degree rappers’ as they called themselves, have released one of the best rap albums in Africa, the ‘Kotoku’ album.

As always, Kracktwist and Samza never disappoint. Their clean and authentic Krio rap mixed with a bit of English and Temne has earned them a place in the hip hop arena in Africa. The duo rose to fame in 2015 after they released one of the hardest rap songs called “Same Life”. “Same Life” became a national anthem in Sierra Leone and gave the duo their recognition. Since then, they have been releasing hits after hits – making them one of the few Sierra Leonean acts with no bad songs since 2015.

The ‘Kotoku’ album is a 15-track album produced by the country’s best of the best young producers like Jassie Jozzy, Yung Lee, Bash Beatz, Beat Professor, Kargricson, and Heziko. This is their third studio album after “Same Life” and “Wi Junkshon”, which became an instant hit in the country. ‘Kotoku’ is a Krio word referring to a container that is seldom imagined to be a safe saving space reserved especially in the wrappers of mostly the aged women.

The songs in the Kotoku album have tracks like ‘Time’ which depicts the inhumane way of life that some people are living, and also serves as advice to young people to do the right things and avoid staying on the wrong path as time isn’t in our favor. The album, of course, wouldn’t be completed without a track for Mama Africa. “Africa” is one of the best tracks on the album. The song reveals the brilliance of the rappers’ storytelling and their ability to use rap to positively influence African culture and tradition. “Africa” is a song that captures the positive image of Africa and its beauty beyond imagination.

Stream the album here 👇👇

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